IGP Heads To Supreme Court Over Verdict On Police Recruitment

0
185

Mohammed Adamu, the Inspector-General of Police, has headed for the Supreme Court seeking to upturn Wednesday’s judgment of the Court of Appeal, which nullified the ongoing recruitment of 10,000 constables across the nation.

The notice of appeal of three grounds together was filed alongside an application for stay of execution of the Appeal Court’s judgment.

The Police Service Commission (PSC) had last year dragged the Nigeria Police Force (NPF), the Inspector General of Police, and the Minister of Police Affairs as first, second, and third respondents respectively to the Federal High Court in Abuja. The Attorney General was subsequently added as a fourth respondent.

READ:  Court Bar NLC, TUC From Proposed Strike

The PSC had sought to restrain the defendants, their officers, and representatives, including anybody or person acting on their behalf from appointing, recruiting, or attempting to appoint or recruit by any means whatsoever any person into any office in the first defendant.

Delivering his judgment in the matter in December 2019, Justice Inyang Ekwo of the Federal High Court had dismissed the case.

The PSC then headed to the Court of Appeal.

A three-man panel of the Court of Appeal led by Justice Olabisi Ige on Wednesday unanimously held that the IGP and the NPF lacked the power to recruit the constables.

It held that it was the Police Service Commission that had the responsibility to carry out the recruitment.

READ:  DISCOS To Suspend New Electricity Tariff

Following these, the IGP and the NPF, through their lawyer, Dr. Alex Izinyon (SAN), had written a letter dated October 2, 2020, to the Chairman of the PSC contending that no step could be taken to enforce the judgment after an appeal and the motion for injunction they had filed against the contested verdict of the Court of Appeal.

The letter was copied to PSC’s lead counsel, Chief Kanu Agabi (SAN).

The notice of appeal faulted the Court of Appeal’s judgment as to the IGP and the NPF contended that the court “erred in law when they held that the provision of section 71 of the Nigeria Police Regulations 1968 made pursuant to section 46 of the Police Act is inconsistent with the provision of paragraph 30 Part I of the Third Schedule to the 1999 Constitution”.

READ:  PDP Drags Lai Mohammed To Court Over NBC Broadcasting Code

They argued section 71 of the Nigeria Police Regulations 1968 specifically conferred on the IGP “the power and responsibility of enlisting recruit constables”, while the provision of “Paragraph 30 Part I of the Third Schedule to the 1999 Constitution and section 6 of the Police Service Commission (Establishment) Act, 2001, the 1st respondent is empowered to appoint persons to offices in the 1st appellant”.

The appellant’s lawyer added that the lower court “was on an error in its findings that the provision of Section 71 of the Nigerian Police Regulations, 1968 made pursuant to Section 46 of the Police Act is inconsistent with the provision of paragraph 30 Part I of the Third Schedule to the 1999 Constitution”.

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.